All posts by Adornments Of The King

Acephalix – Decreation

(20 Buck Spin / Sentient Ruin Laboratories, 2017)

After taking a rest for a couple of years after their last awesome album “Deathless Master”, one of my favourite ”Crusty” Death Metal bands Acephalix returns with another high quality album.

The musical style of the band is still right there where it was, perhaps even more energetic than before, while being definitely more hard-hitting and of great grades. A combination of slower and mid-tempo Deathliness and D-beats (and even blast-beats), gives room for a more Rocking style, previously heard not so much in Acephalix. In a lot of ways this album is a musical culmination of the member’s other Metallic projects, such as Vastum and Lawless.

All areas of the music are materialized with great skills, without overdoing anything, which would distance the band from its stylistic roots.

The in-your-face strings open Doomy and the Deathly damping and tremolo riffs offer nothing new under the sun, but are 100% loyal to the roots of the craft, spiced with some howling (often very Slayerlike) leads. The guitar-sound is crunchy and heavy as fuck, delivering the band’s trademark riffs.

The beats are performed with great precision to give a quality feeling, while being human and organic enough to appeal to oldschool Death Metal fans. The mixing of the drums works fine as hell as well. The bass-drums are pounding, the snares are hammering, and the rides are pleasantly clanky.

The vocals are as cool and entertaining as ever, going mostly with low growling and grunting, spiced with screams and shouts here and there.

In the past the band’s lyrics have been heavily Influenced by thinkers such as Georges Bataille, and without having read the lyrics of this album, I’m guessing they are similar psychological, philosophical and anthropological observations of the human condition as on the previous albums.

Graced by the magical touch of Greg Wilkinson, the soundscapes of the album manage to be damp, dark, heavy and murky, yet crisp and airy at the same time. The cover art matches the music perfectly, with its gloomy description of a chthonic mental cave full of details.

This album is perfect for all conscious and openminded fans of old-school Death Metal, whom do not object having their sounds a bit more benign and lyrics deeper than the current trends mostly offer. As one song-title of the album points out, ”God Is Laughing”, but the daemons of Death Metal are most definitely sneering and grinning satisfied.

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Skrapez – Sorcery

(Hit+Run, 2017)

Skrapez is an experimental musical duo (originally from San Diego), part of the artist-collective Hit+Run (with many totally cool artists releasing stuff), with a huge amount of releases in their disco. The two artists known as Tenshun and Psychopop have also released a lot of stuff under other aliases, but this is the project that has mostly caught my eye and ear.

Having just toured Europe with another awesome artist Gonjasufi, this release has been recorded in the California desert in conjunction with that tour. All the music of Skrapez which I have been exposed to so far, has been traditional beat-making (using sampling, scratching, and drum-pads) put through filters of heavy distortion and other violent effects, and the two songs on this release are not different in that sense.

Yet although as harsh and crushing as the music is, it manages to stay in audial harmony and balance when it comes to the different tracks on the songs, while being chaotically and almost disturbingly psychedelic and hypnotic at the same time. And that is no easy feat when it comes to stuff like this.

The two songs (both of which last exactly 09:59) on this release are basically made of different parts or chapters, something I have also heard on previous Skrapez-material, but this time around the parts are not too distinctly apart in content. Beats of harsh electronics, multilayered percussions, psychedelic synths and various samples and effects take total control of the atmosphere for the 20 mins, in a really DIY and low-fi yet creative way. The first song is a bit more beat-oriented, while the second one is more Ambient and experimental.

The music sounds like it has been made by human hands dripping with blood and sweat, rather than with some Ableton Live gimmicks. This stuff is perfect when taking the bus to your shitty job, or inspecting it more closely while high on some drug, or even as background music while working on your computer.

Highly recommended for all fans of harsh Electronic / Industrial sounds and traditional Hip Hop made with classic sampling techniques, especially if you already dig low-fi stuff like the before-mentioned Gonjasufi and similar mentalities.

Available as a tape through Hit+Run.

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Der Blutharsch – What Makes You Pray

(WKN, 2017)

Der Blutharsch – the already 20 years old lovechild of the psychedelic visionaire and an all around jolly fellow Albin Julius – continues on the same progressive road which has taken form on the groups latest releases. In the empire of Der Blutharsch, the roads have been lately paved with some trippy vibes indeed, and they all lead to inner worlds of cosmic and magickal proportions.

The first song starts with a hypnotic sampled clanking sound and some buzzing riffing from the stoned guitar, slowly adding some percussives and jamming leads. When the song has already cast it’s trance-inducing spell upon you, Marthynna’s eerie whispering and preaching vocals suddenly shake you a bit, while the song continues to jam away very slowly with a bit more eventful drumming and synth-effects.

The second song continues along the same lines as the first one, built on top of a cool retro-sounding synth-bass-line, adding a bit more rhythm and speed to the ritual, and a bit more melodic singing from Marthynna, ending in a weird awesome spoken sample.

The thrid song goes a bit more experimental with the synth-lines and riffing, being almost comical, but it gets you in a good mood for sure. However, the fourth song is the best one yet, with it’s epic synths , tribal percussions and moody guitar leads. The fifth song is again a bit more tongue-in-cheek and amusing deliverance of psychedelic Rock, and makes you realize how well the more dark and slower songs work great next to these more cheerful songs.

The sixth song is an awesome ambient piece while the seventh song is again a quite tribal-oriented, with a massive crushing bass. The eight song has an extremely beautiful and atmospheric piano-like melody coupled with buzzing guitars, basses  ambient synths and weird choir-like singing. Altho without any percussions, this song is definitely one of the highlights of the album.

The ninth song features a pretty weird heavily effectizied and almost disturbing percussive sample and organ-sounds, and the tenth song consists of a synth-sound so bassy, heavy and vibrating, I thought my speakers are going to explode. Definitely a powerful way to end this album with a bang.

The soundscapes of the album range from pretty murky and mysterious frequencies to clear outputs, keeping the two worlds in a good and atmospheric balance. Mastered by Thomas Tannenberg (of the Austrian experimental Black Metal band Abigor), the overall audial quality and mentality of the album is great for trippy stuff like this.

This release gives you the safe (?) and sound Der Blutharsch psychedelia we have grown to love in the last years, with no big surprises, but the trip is again high quality ritualistic stoner ambience and groovy jamming. Fans of the band will naturally get this release, and if you haven’t yet been exposed to the music of the band, this album is a splendid introduction.

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Wyatt E. – Exile To Beyn Neharot

(Shalosh Cult, 2017)

Wyatt E. is a three-piece from Belgium (consisting of guitars, synths and drums), recently brought into my attention with their awesome display of steady and hypnotic, yet intense and deeply colourful Psychedelic and Doomy Prog-Rock jamming, with strong nods to the desert ways of classic Stoner. Before this release, they have apparently released one album, similarly containing two about 20min songs such as this one, but after a quick listen of the first one, it is evident the band has progressed musically and aurally even further after their first release.

The first song “Nebuchadnezzar II” starts with ambient whirling synth-effects reminiscent of an ominous wind or a swarm of insects, before adding ritualistic percussion and sitar-sounds, as well as some flutelike synth-effects. A very minimalistic start for the album, yet the listener gets the feeling of high quality and strong emancipation for something mind-blowing, and the listener is not wrong. As the song explodes into a slow and Doomy beat, loud guitars with heavy effects invade our minds. Sounding a bit out of place (like from an old Western movie) at first, the ear gets used to the idea of this section of the song quite quickly, and the trip is on. Going quite intense at parts due to background guitars of heavy audial aesthetics and other synthy effects, the song keeps the listener in it’s grasp nicely to the middle part of the song, where the journey slows down into a Middle-Eastern melody from the guitar (and a cool organ in the background), before exploding into new realms with quite heavily distorted guitars. After yet again a short and more calm part, the song ends in truly awesome sounding Oriental tremolo melodies from a very atmospheric guitar, ending the song in great style. The whole experience lives up to it’s name, bringing to my mind the Babylonian king’s dreams of doom and apocalypse, as told in the biblical narrative.

The second song, “Ode To Ishtar”, starts with some minimalistic but tribal sounding drumming and low thumping basses, backed up with various vintage-sounding synths and howling and chirping synth-like effects, which bring to my mind an astral Babylonian river of futuristic and retro aesthetics. As Ishtar descends further and further into the collective unconscious, the underworld is revealed to be a vast and cosmic place of many layers and plains opposite from anything claustrophobic. As the drumming turns more complicated adding some snares and crashes into the ritual call, more wavy synths and Egyptian-sounding guitars appear, joining the caravan floating on this cosmic river. The whole experience is so pleasant I can imagine spending hours and hours tripping here, letting the river take me to more and more exotic sceneries of the vast and forgotten subconscious. As more drony synths appear and the drumming intensifies further, guitar leads jamming naturally Middle-Eastern melodies take over the experience almost completely, placing the final trance upon the mesmerized listener. A bit halfway through the song, the awesome displays of the musicians and instruments halt down into a stoned transition, before morphing into a quite groovy and jamming beat from the drums, as the other instruments continue their hypnotic riffing while growing slowly into yet another mental climax. The end of the song cuts some of the aural layers down, ending the experience in quite serene states.

While both of the songs deliver perfectly what they intend to do, the second song is a bit better than first one when it comes to overall harmony of the various psychedelic sounds. Both songs have a strong feeling of live-recording into them, which naturally suits this kind of music perfectly.

Altho hypnotic and trancelike, this stuff might be too much as a casual meditative experience for most people, but everyone experienced in psychedelics (and/or longer meditation sessions) will recognize instantly the great psychedelic and spiritual potential of this music.

A heartily recommended release for all fans of intense yet patient aural psychedelia, especially for those with a soft spot for eighties and nineties synth-vibes, classic sustained and hypnotic Prog Rock, and mental Middle-Eastern aesthetics.

I wish a great future of touring and jamming in the studio for this band. They totally deserve it.

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Interview with Street Sects

Street Sects made a name for themselves in 2014 with a few intense singles, but now with the release of their debut full-length “End Position” the shit of humanity has hit the fan once and for all and the skeletons are marching furiously out of the closets. The band’s incorporation of classic Industrial, Punk Rock and Power Electronics seems to come straight from their suffering hearts, and demands a chat.

Hello! Where are you currently writing this, and how has the day fared you so far? This half of the year has most likely been eventful for you, with the release of your masterpiece “End Position”?

SHAUN: I’m writing the answers to this on a notepad while waiting in a Firestone Auto lobby. Thinking of the eventfulness of End Position, I’m now reflecting mostly on the west coast tour we just finished. However, the best part of all of this, for me, has been the people writing to us to personally say the record resonated with them. That has given me some happiness, as well as some great sadness for all the years I wasted on bullshit.

LEO: I’m in Dallas right now, visiting my girlfriend. The day has just begun. And yeah, things have definitely been busy since the record came out. It’s been exciting, but I’m hoping things will be even busier next year. I’d like to think that our “masterpiece” has still yet to be written.

You are formed in Austin Texas, creating music that hasn’t really been in the minds of wider audiences, besides the nostalgic and retro-obsessed Industrialists and Electro-punks. How is the local scene, or the scenes of the US for that matter, when it comes to stuff like yours?

SHAUN: The local scene is comprised of many genres, from Country Western to Metal to analog Electro to deejay culture–and then everything that goes with three major music festivals per year. There isn’t a scene for the music we’ve written in particular, but there are many talented, experimental Electronic artists in Austin.

LEO: There’s a pretty vibrant dark Electronic music scene here in Austin. Most of it is either Noise or analog synth based stuff, but there’s a small handful of artists who exist somewhere outside of those two camps. We don’t always fit well on most bills around here. That seems to be the case on tour also. Because we don’t fall neatly into a category, we tend to find ourselves on all different kinds of bills, which sometimes works out, and sometimes backfires. For every one person that seems to dig what we’re doing, there’s definitely at least one or two who can’t fucking stand it. That’s great in a way, but it makes finding the right crowds who appreciate what we do a bit more of a challenge. I think a lot of people who frequent dark music shows have a pre-disposition of what they expect certain genre artists to sound like or adhere to, and we don’t really fall in line with that.

Personally, I like to think of genres as being colors on a palette, as tools or resources to be used in service of creating something unique, rather than as established categories to be filed under. Other people came up with these ideas of genre. As singular concepts genres are limiting and repetitive, but if you think of genres as being historical data or raw materials to be explored and exploited, it can be energizing and inspiring. I’ve seen people online arguing about our record, and whether or not it’s Power Electronics, or Industrial Metal, or Gabber-Noise or countless other goofy genre tags… I think some of these people might be disappointed to learn that we seriously couldn’t care less about any of that bullshit. We don’t sit around listening to Industrial music all day. There’s a lot of artists from the genre that we dig, of course, and we certainly respect the legacy and craft of the early innovators, but we aren’t trying to carry a torch for any of that stuff. Industrial music is an inspiration for us, not a blueprint.I probably listen to more seventies Rock than anything, because I like the production from that era. The attention to detail, the three dimensional warmth. The entire year or so we were working on End Position I don’t think I listened to much of anything, regularly, besides Street Sects demos and Roxy Music. Part of that is because I get ear fatigue from working at a venue and listening to the demos Shaun sends me, but part of it is also because I’m not trying to steep my brain in heavy Electronic music constantly. I don’t blast Death Grips and Skinny Puppy on my way to work. Those guys are great, but I don’t find myself in the mood to listen to that kind of stuff very often. For me, Street Sects is very much about creating art for selfish reasons. It feels good to create and perform… It scratches a certain kind of primal itch. It’s not about writing a love letter to our predecessors.

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What other styles of music have you been into, besides the obvious influences of your music? Have you been or are you currently active with other bands before Street Sects?

SHAUN: Leo and I have played together in a few bands before. Mostly it was guitar driven music. Guitar was my primary instrument for a long time. I started taking lessons around eleven years of age. Growing up, I listened to a lot of Rap. Kids in my neighborhood would get together to play basketball and play on cassette all the Deathrow Records stuff, and then Wu-Tang. Later on I got into Metal, followed by Jazz.

LEO: I was born in 1980, so as a kid I was obsessed with MTV. During grade school it was everything to me. MTV, comic books, and video games. My dad was an ex air force guy who’d held onto all the records he’d bought while he was in the service, traveling the world, and he played me a lot of great stuff when I was young. Black Sabbath, Frank Zappa, Steely Dan, those are some of the ones that stuck with me. He wouldn’t let me use his record player when he wasn’t home, so I would just flip through his records and obsess over the album art and lyric sheets when he was at work. I had a cassette player in my room, and my parents would buy me tapes for my birthday and Christmas, but tapes were never as cool to me as my dad’s records. The artwork was so much bigger and he had these really nice old Bose speakers he would play them through. Everything about it made the music seem so much more alive to me. I remember a really definitive moment for me was when I saw the premiere of the music video for Metallica’s “One” on MTV. It blew my fucking mind. My cassette player had a built in microphone in it, and you could put in a blank tape (or a regular tape with scotch tape over the two holes on the bottom) and record audio onto it. I used to put the tape player up to the TV speaker and record songs off MTV that I liked. The next time I saw “One” come on I recorded it. I listened to that tape until it was worn out. When I finally got a proper version of And Justice For All on cassette for my birthday or whatever that year, I was really disappointed with the album version of One because it didn’t have all those badass samples from Johnny Got His Gun that were in the video version. If you listen to that version, especially the ending, with the machine-like drumming and those samples laid over it, it has a very Industrial feel to it.

In terms of other projects, I started off playing in Hardcore bands in the mid-late nineties, the most notable being Failsafe, an off kilter, DC inspired Hardcore band I was in with Terence Hannum (now of Locrian), and Jon Glover (now of Ars Phoenix). Another band I was in with Jon, back in the early 2000’s, was a band called Kilborough. We had sort of an uncategorizable sound that blended of a lot of different elements. The couple of years I spent in that project were instrumental to how I work as a musician today. One of the members in that group, Todd Pendv, was kind of like a mentor to me in some ways during that time. He opened my mind up to a lot of new music, art, film and literature, and really helped me redefine my creative approach. I can be a very stubborn, one track minded person sometimes, and he kind of beat into me the importance of experimentation as exercise, and also to take my time with things. When I was younger I was always in a hurry to finish projects, and that’s obviously not the best approach when you want to make something of lasting value. Todd went on to start Pendv Sound Recordings in NYC, and he released records by Chelsea Wolfe, Sasha Grey’s Atelecine and more before leaving behind the music world entirely for a successful career in the fashion industry.

Street Sects is the only currently active project that I’m involved with right now. We’ve got more than enough on our plate to keep me busy. However, I did contribute vocals to an EP for a project called History, which is a thing I did a few years back with Daisy Caplan (formerly of Foxy Shazam). It’s kind of his solo thing, in a way, and I just sang on it, but it’s significant to me because I did about half of it while I was still an alcoholic/drug addict (when I was literally at my absolute worst), and the other half I did after I got out of rehab and was living in a halfway house in Jacksonville FL. So to me it kind of represents this huge transitional phase in my life. Daisy and his wife Rachelle also played a huge role in me getting sober, but that’s another story. We finally had that record mixed and mastered this past year and it should be coming out on Realicide Youth Records sometime in 2017.

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As you work musically mostly with electronics and samples, are you pretty much fed up with so-called organic music, or is this just the way of this particular project? Has Electronic music been something that has interested you since a kid?

SHAUN: Electronic music has allowed me to move outside of expressions I’ve learned over the years with guitar. Also, yeah, I go back and forth on wanting to hear recognizable Rock n Roll sounds in music. I need a combination of things now. A process that isn’t focused on gear but rather an emotional reaction to a particular sound, no matter how that sound gets documented.

LEO: I wouldn’t say that I’m fed up with organic music at all. Electronics are a means to an end. I don’t see Street Sects relying entirely upon the same means indefinitely. For now, it works

I was more into Rock and Heavy Metal as a kid than I was anything Electronic based. The first Wlectronic bands I really got into were definitely Industrial bands. Ministry’s Psalm 69 and NIN’s Downward Spiral were both pretty huge records for me when I was young, but by then I was about 12 or 13.

The themes of the album seem to be coming from personal places of deep disgust, depression, apathy and even self-destruction. The creation of the album has most likely been a purifying experience for you?

LEO: Not really. Speaking for myself, I don’t use music as a way to work through my problems. It’s self reflection, sure, but I don’t see it as therapy. At least not at this point. I mean, say you’re an artist, and you hate your face. So you sit in front of a mirror and draw a self portrait. You draw it as accurately as you possibly can. When you’ve finished the drawing, do you find that you dislike your face any less? I don’t think it’s that easy.

The clear and melodically sung vocal-parts of your music are performed very professionally. Is this approach, besides the more screaming aspects of the vocals, something you had in mind from the start of the band or something you realized could work later on?

LEO: It was something I wanted from the beginning. If you listen to the early 7″ stuff, the singing parts are there, they’re just buried under a lot of effects and poor mixing. Shaun and I have had a few other projects together where clear and melodic singing were a primary focal point of the music. With this project, I wanted it to be glued to the mix in a way where it becomes sort of another texture, but still prominent enough to draw you in, to exist as the emotive, human element amidst the Industrial soundscape.

As you play live as well, how would you compare the performances on the stage to the work at the studio? What is the typical Street Sects song-creation process like in general?

SHAUN: There are times when the workflow is good and strong and I’ll sketch a song all in one go, but often I prefer to make a song piecemeal, sending Leo sketches and asking for detailed impressions, then manipulating texture and tone until something sticks. As for studio compared with live, they’re completely separate experiences. I love studio work and also love listening to records in headphones. I’ve always loved listening to recorded music more than listening to it in a live setting. That being said, we aim for detailed work on the records  and then punishing volume live. Our live show is meant to induce other reactions not necessarily felt in the safe space of the headphones experience, like total bodily immersion, fear, tension, etc.

LEO: The live show is meant it be immersive, and in some ways, interactive. I have a short attention span when it comes to live shows. I get bored very easily, and nine out of ten times I’d rather go see a movie than go see a band. So for me the goal with our live shows has always been to put on a show that I would be entertained by, if i were an audience member. It needs to be more than some rockers up on a stage doing their best Rock and Roller routine, or some fucking haircuts hunched over a table, massaging their overpriced analog gear. No offense to any of our friends out there doing their thing, but I’m just fucking bored of the same old show. I need something that wakes me up and makes me a little uncomfortable. That said, our live show is always a work in progress and it’s nowhere near where we’d like it to be. We are working within our means right now, but it’s going to evolve and improve. The recorded work is an entirely different approach. You can’t bottle up the live experience into an album. So we focus on the songcraft, on writing pieces of music that hopefully engage the listener on both on emotional and an intellectual level.

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Picture: @doomsdayjill

Your album was released by an underground label The Flenser, which suits your stuff perfectly I can imagine, but are you personally supporters of the DIY-mentality opposed to being on a major label? How important do you see promotion (and for example touring) when it comes to your music?

SHAUN: All I have to do is look at the amazing roster of artists on The Flenser to know we’re in the right place. As for DIY, it definitely played a part in our live set up, from deliberately booking DIY venues for intimacy and intensity to financing our own multi tiered PA system–which fucked my credit last year–to ensure that every audience would get the exact same punishing experience.

LEO: DIY is everything. It has to be, whether you like it or not. Look around you. The money is gone. It’s been gone. The nineties are over. No one gets a free ride anymore. If you want something to happen you have to get off your ass and do it yourself. You have to tour, you have to self promote, you have to book, manage, everything. We’re very fortunate that a label as hardworking and respected as The Flenser believed in us and gave us an opportunity to be included on their roster, but I don’t think they would have even considered us if they didn’t think we were 100% committed to making this project happen, with or without help.

Thanks for this interview! What are your plans for the rest of the year? Are you already working on a follow-up to your first album, or are you letting it sink in to the audiences first, and see later on which approach to take next?

SHAUN: We’re definitely not waiting. For me the impulse to write is every day, even if I only write out the music idea as a sentence in a notebook. Earlier this year, we started work on an EP, much of which is now finished. Likely that won’t come out until next year. It contains much of what was learned while making End Position but also has instrumentation and textural range that was excluded from writing that album. We feel an Ep is an opportunity to experiment with sound while in between larger ideas, so it’s not indicative of what to expect from the second album.

LEO: Thank you for your interest! We’ve got a lot of things in the steamer right now. Realistically, the proper full length follow up to End Position won’t be coming out until 2018, but we’ve got a few other things in the works, so 2017 definitely won’t be a quiet year for us. We’re also planning on touring again in the spring, so there’s that to look forward to.

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Zeroh – Tinnitus

(Hit+Run, 2016)

The global live-screen-printing and musical collective Hit+Run has been putting out interesting stuff for many years, including names like Crimekillz, Kate Mo$$, Kutmah, Skrapez and Zackey Force Funk. The name has been to me synonymous with originality, creativity and DIY-mentality, and this album by the Los Angeles native Zeroh is certainly no different.

The music on this album ranges from Madlib-like beat-crafting to full on cacophony. Half of the songs don’t even have a beat, and dance somewhere between rhythmic Ambient and Noise (and Industrial Music if you will), and some have very traditional but minimalistic Hip Hop vibes to them. Always gritty, noisy, full of effects and experimental (playful) as hell, the production of this album often brings to my mind a mixture of Ka’s “Honor Killed The Samurai” and Gonjasufi’s “Callus”. Still, this stuff stands originally on its own, and shows the awesome skills of Zeroh as a producer.

The rapping gets the same treatment as the music, when it comes to heavy effects and experimental production. Besides that, Zeroh is one of those MCs who uses his voice like an instrument for jamming, and his verses are thoughtful and cool as fuck. He likes to play with his voice, changing style even many times in a sentence, wacky as shit, but still sounding totally in control. At times he sounds dark and serious, and at times he sounds cartoonish and comical. Which fits his style of writing lyrics perfectly. The symbiosis of the two put you in a concentrated yet psychedelic and sometimes even spiritual zone. The previous comparison with Gonjasufi often applies to the vocals as well, but there is so much more going on here. Zeroh is in a league of his own. The only two guests on this album, The Koreatown Oddity and Low Leaf, blend splendidly with the rest of the material.

This album is a treasure-chest of lyrical and vocal imaginativeness and hazy musical experimentality. Given the apparent skills of Zeroh as a producer of music (besides being an awesome rapper), I would have liked to hear a bit more variety on the beats (such as more drum-beats), but then again the stuff on this album works great as a whole, and does justice to the awesome cover-picture (or vice versa). If you are into experimental Hip Hop and interesting textures of sound, check this totally impressive album out. And while you’re at it, check out the collaboration-album between Zeroh and Jeremiah Jae, “Holy Smoke”, as well. Pure bliss.

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Der Blutharsch And The Infinite Church Of The Leading Hand – Sucht & Ordnung

(WKN, 2016)

At this point of his artistic career, Albin Julius probably is not that interested in answering questions about his musical past under the name Der Blutharsch. After the pretty much total audial transformation of the band (altho certain vibes and attitudes came along for the ride from the previous incarnation of course), the audiences of the group have now been accustomed to the Psychedelic Rock version of Albin’s musical visions, and there is no doubt he will continue to change and progress his musical identity in the future. But right now, we have this new album in our hands.

“Zucht und Ordnung” in German means “Discipline and Order”, a term associated with for example Christian or Fascist authority in society. “Sucht und Ordnung” however means “Addiction and Order”, and as an album stands for quite different mentalities, in its improvised and jamming ways. Recorded live at Pure Sound Studio (Vienna), this album features three songs and about 30 minutes of intense Psychedelic Rock the Der Blutharsch way we have become so familiar with in the recent years. Of course there is s certain discipline and order present in the song structures and performances of the recent material of the band, but nevertheless this is fucking psychedelia, which stands for total assimilation of control.

The album lifts off calmly with moody oriental melodies from the reverberated guitar, backed by ride-cymbals and the ever-expanding synth. But when the drums and basses kick off, I am surprised to hear a Surf Rock beat from the drums, together with an extremely heavy bass jamming sweet melodies with the already jamming distorted guitars. As the song progresses the synths change colour and texture like splashing various paints on a canvas, making me wanna be high as fuck on weed while listening to this song. After a break-like calm sequence the song ends in a sweet rocking beat and high guitar solos, which together with the organ-like synth makes me feel very classic seventies. This is the exact alchemical stuff the godlike albums of old were made from. This band gets it.

The second song starts off more heavy, not quite Doomy but nearly. Here were are introduced to the powerful majestic and almost preaching vocals of Marthynna. There has always been real dominance and sweetness at the same time in her voice, and this song is no different. However, if I was a bit surprised about the Surf Rock drumming in the first song, I am most definitely lifted off my chair when the song turns into a cool intense blast-beat and tremolo-riff driven Blackened kaleidoscope, before sinking again into slower currents. This was something I did quite not see coming from this band, not yet anyway.

The third song is a bit longer than the previous two, starting out really slow, before kicking off with a pretty minimalistic damping guitar riff and steady rocking drum-beat backed with a cool organ-sound and heavily phasing synths. Very classic Stoner (or just ancient Progressive) stuff here, staring at the night sky in the desert high on mushrooms. Marthynna’s chanting vocals fit the song again very well, as do the electrified howling effects taking the hypnotic riffing further into the mind’s eye. The song starts to fade towards the end only making an intense comeback, giving me spiralling chills down my spine. A very steady and well made song ending the album in extremely positive vibes.

In this age of music softwares one tends to forget the awesome power and magic of organic music. This album is a must for all fans of the previous albums of the band (especially after the musical “transformation”), and for all fans of hypnotic, psychedelic and hallucinatory jamming music in general. This album is my personal favourite among the band’s discography of the last five years.

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